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Pioneering Green Living for a Healthier Humanity and Earth…

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Introduction

Have you ever thought about what you’re actually eating? Is it certified organic or conventional? If it’s not organic, you’re likely getting pesticides like glyphosate (a.k.a RoundUp), genetically modified ingredients (now called “bio-engineered”), and maybe even lab-grown meat. Have you ever read the label on your cleaning products or personal care items? In a world dominated by chemically-laden products and environmental challenges, these are the very questions that ignited a total life transformation for green living pioneer, Amy Todisco, over three decades ago. She has inspired and guided thousands of people, giving them the honest independent information that they need to make the best choices for themselves, their families AND the Earth.

Growing Up in a World of Toxins

Amy grew up in a New York City (NYC) apartment. Her mom was devoted to good nutrition and prepared healthy food from scratch, but that clashed with the overwhelming presence of toxic chemicals infiltrating their living space. Monthly cockroach spraying (yup, even on the upper east side) and dry cleaning fumes creeping in through the window, created a toxic fog. Amy, with her sensitivity to the environment around her, knew there had to be a better way to live.

A “Green” Aha Moment

Fast forward to Amy’s first summer job at a little health food store in NYC. That experience opened up a whole new world for her. She was introduced to “organic” foods, vitamins and herbal supplements, and even the world of juice fasting and raw foods. It was like finding a treasure trove of natural living secrets. An avid reader, she gobbled up even more information from the health books in the store. Amy had a toolkit for thriving in a whole new way.

A Turn in the Road

You know that moment when you realize that you’re totally on your own, that nobody else has your back? Amy had one of those moments. She was browsing through another health food store book shelf, pregnant, and 28 years old. She thumbed through a little paperback book called “The Non-Toxic Baby,” and it blew her mind. She learned that there were all these sneaky toxic chemicals hiding in plain sight, legally allowed in everyday products like shampoos, toothpaste, cleaning products, and carpets. These chemicals had health impacts and nobody was really talking about it, much less regulating it. How could the powers that be allow this to happen? Many product labels weren’t even required to tell consumers what was in them. It was a wake-up call. With a baby on the way, she knew that it was up to her to do the research and make some changes.

From Dreamer to Doer: Nurturing Health and Earth

Armed with her newfound awareness and determination, Amy dove into researching products and companies. She read labels, sorted through all of the “natural” and “nontoxic” claims to find the real green products and the companies that were truly walking their talk. Her Massachusetts community benefited from her discoveries through her letters to the editor to the local paper. Once she learns something important, she feels compelled to share it with others. Next step was creating a first of it’s kind Earth Day Celebration event that catalyzed an environmental movement there. Shortly after that, the state revealed that her little seacoast community had 3 types of cancer above the state average. After she got over the shock, it was time to start a nonprofit, the Marblehead Cancer Prevention Project, to examine the possible environmental contributions, like pesticide spraying. Thankfully, the town health department responded by limiting homeowner’s ability to spray toxic lawn and tree pesticides.

Vermont Called…

Despite her toxic beginnings, 22 years ago Amy felt called to move to Vermont. She wanted a more rural, healthier, nature-filled life, with like-minded people and beautiful landscapes. Shortly after she arrived, she joined forces with Seventh Generation’s founder to lead the Household Toxins Institute.  After about one year, she wanted to help people more directly. So, she started an in-home consulting business to help people rid their indoor spaces of toxic chemical products. One of her high profile clients was a band member in the popular Vermont musical group, Phish.  A number of years later, she was invited to be the technical editor for the book, Green Living for Dummies. Most surprising was a call from one of Oprah’s producers. While Oprah didn’t end up visiting her Vermont home as planned, Amy hopes to chat with Oprah on her Super Soul Sunday program in the near future. Through her writing, speaking, mentoring, and coaching, Amy has been raising awareness and guiding people towards a healthier, toxin-free life for many years.

Thriving in the Green Mountain State

Fourteen years ago she made a dream come true. Well, 2 really. She met her soulmate, who happened to be an organic farmer, and they’ve been living on their organic farm, which she’s helped grow. So, what’s next? In order to help people far and wide, she’s launching a three-month online program called “How to Live a Toxin-Free Life.” She’ll be helping participants navigate this crazy world of toxins, cut through the “green washing”, and find real solutions that are right for them. She’ll even share organic gardening and cooking tips. Amy’s initiative offers an escape from toxicity, paving the way for a more sustainable, holistic, and earth-friendly existence. With awareness and guidance, Amy believes that we have the power to take back our health, while also living lightly on the earth.

Amy Todisco is a green living mentor, transformational coach and retreat leader. Based on her organic farm in Vermont, she specializes in guiding and empowering people to live a less toxic, healthier. eco-friendly life. She’s been featured on HGTV, Vermont Public Radio, and Vermont Public TV.

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