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The Cleveland Orchestra Plays Schubert, MLK Memorial Concerts, and More | Arts Stories & Interviews | Cleveland

click to enlarge Franz Welser-Möst, conducting the New York Philharmonic in 2020. - FLICKR/STEVEN PISANO

Franz Welser-Möst, conducting the New York Philharmonic in 2020.

The concert calendar this week features three interesting orchestral programs, two of which will travel to New York’s Carnegie Hall following their performances in Cleveland. 

On January 12 at 7:30 p.m., Franz Welser-Möst will lead The Cleveland Orchestra in a program that weaves movements of Berg’s Lyric Suite together with Schubert’s Symphony No. 8 (Unfinished). The concert also includes Schubert’s Mass No. 6. featuring the Cleveland Orchestra Chorus and soprano Joélle Harvey, mezzo-soprano Daryl Freedman, tenors Julian Prégardien and Martin Mitterrutzner, and bass-baritone Dashon Burton. Severance Music Center, 11001 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland. The program will be repeated on Friday the 13th and Saturday the 14th. Tickets are available online. You can also catch it at Carnegie Hall on January 18. 

On January 14 at 7:30 p.m., Christopher Wilkins conducts the Akron Symphony Orchestra in Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, Julia Perry’s Pastoral, Xavier Foley’s Double Concerto “For Justice and Peace,” Bottesini’s Double Bass Concerto No. 2, and Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings. Soloists include Eunice Kim, violin, and Xavier Foley, double bass, along with members of the Gospel Meets Symphony Choir E.J. Thomas Hall, University of Akron, 198 Hill St. Tickets available online.

On January 17 at 7:30 p.m., Raphael Jiménez will lead the Oberlin Orchestra and Choirs in a Carnegie Hall Preview Concert. The program includes Brahms’ Tragic Overture, Iván Enrique Rodríguez’s “A Metaphor for Power,” and R. Nathaniel Dett’s “The Ordering of Moses” with Chabrelle Williams, soprano, Ronnita Miller, mezzo-soprano, Limmie Pulliam, tenor, and Eric Greene, baritone. Finney Chapel, 90 N. Professor St. Oberlin. Free. Click here for the livestream. You can also catch it at Carnegie Hall on the 20th.

In conjunction with that performance, on January 19 at 5:30 p.m., you can view a livestream from Merkin Hall titled “Cultural Context in Dett’s ‘The Ordering of Moses.'” The piece is widely considered the composer’s magnum opus in compositional scale and in its articulation of recurrent issues concerning both the construction of Black identity and artistry. Click here to access the stream and for more information.

And on January 15 at 3 p.m., enjoy a Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Concert celebrating Dr. King’s life and mission through music and the written word. It’s presented by The Music Settlement and Bop Stop. Free but registration required. Bop Stop, 2920 Detroit Avenue, Cleveland.

The Cleveland Orchestra’s annual Martin Luther King Day Celebration also takes place on January 15 at 7 p.m. Daniel Reith conducts joined by Soloman Howard, bass and narrator, Peter Lawson Jones, narrator and emcee, and the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Chorus Dr. William Henry Caldwell, director. The program includes music by Black composers Florence Price and William L. Dawson. Although the concert is sold out, it will be broadcast live on WCLV 90.3 and WKSU 89.7 FM, with live, simultaneous streaming is available at ideastream.org

On January 16, the MLK Day celebration will continue at Severance Hall with a free Community Day featuring performances by musicians of The Cleveland Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra Youth Chorus, and a gospel ensemble. Click here for details.

If you’re looking for improvised music, on Friday, January 13 at 8 p.m. the Cleveland Uncommon Sound Project will present Chicago-based improvisers Ken Vandermark (reeds) and Tim Daisy (percussion), with an opening performance by Dana Jessen (bassoon). Convivium 33 Gallery, 1422 E. 33rd Street, Cleveland. Suggested donation $15.

Visit the Clevelandclassical.com Concert Listings page for more information.


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